Fall '21 Schedules, Scores & Standings: | CJSL | DPL | G-ECNL | G-ECRL | B-ECNL | B-ECRL | Challenge Cup | EDP | EHYSL | GA
| LIJSL |MLS NXT | National League | NCSANJ | NEAL | ENY State Cup | WYSL | CDYSL | Section 1 HS (West.) Boys |Girls


Forum Search
Fall 2021
Scores & Standings
Girls Academy League
GA Schedule & Standings
MLS Next Scores & Standings
Scores & Standings
National League
North Atlantic
EDP 2021/2022
Scores & Standings
WYSL Scores & Standings
Fall '21 Scores & Standings
ENY State Cups 2021-2022
Challenge Cup
NY State Cup
Maxpreps High School
New York
New Jersey
Connecticut
Maryland
Latest Posts
BHS (2005:U17, 2004:U18, 2003:U19)
by Anonymous - 09/20/21 09:26 PM
G2008:U14 Fall 2021/Spring 2022
by Anonymous - 09/20/21 09:16 PM
Where are all the Referees?
by Anonymous - 09/20/21 08:55 PM
Stony Brook SC & Atletico FC Merge
by Anonymous - 09/20/21 06:12 PM
G2009:U13 Fall 2021/Spring 2022
by Anonymous - 09/20/21 06:01 PM
Who's Online Now
1 members (Larry Miller), 69 guests, and 16 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Previous Thread
Next Thread
New Reply
Print Thread
Rate Thread
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 20,423
Likes: 49
Chief Rocker
Back of THE NET
OP Online
Chief Rocker
Back of THE NET
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 20,423
Likes: 49

To help prevent physical assault and verbal abuse in the leagues and clubs within the Eastern New York Youth Soccer Association (ENYYSA); the Association has adopted a ZERO TOLERANCE POLICY.

This policy applies to all coaches, players, parents, spectators and other supporters and referees effective immediately. Abusive and obscene language, violent play/conduct, fighting and other behavior (including, but not limited to sarcasm, taunting, etc.) deemed detrimental to the game between the above mentioned groups will not be tolerated. The ultimate responsibility for the actions of coaches, players and spectators resides with the member clubs.

It is the responsibility of the coaches to provide referee support and spectator control, and it is the responsibility of the member clubs to provide instructions to their coaches on how they are expected to carry this out. This policy applies before, during and after the game at the soccer field and its immediate surrounding areas.

Parents & Spectators

No parent or spectator shall persistently address the referee or assistant referees at any time.

This includes, but is not limited to:

  1. Parents and spectators shall not dispute calls during or after the game.
  2. Parents and spectators shall not make remarks to the referee(s) or advise the referee(s) to watch certain players or attend to rough play.
  3. Parents and spectators shall never yell at the referee(s), including criticism, sarcasm, harassment, intimidation or feedback of any kind before, during or after the game.

The only allowable exceptions to the above are:

  1. Parents and spectators may respond to a referee who has initiated a conversation, until such time as the referee terminates the conversation.
  2. Parents and spectators may point out an emergency or safety issues, such as a player apparently injured on the field or observed fighting.

Additionally, parents and spectators shall not make derogatory comments to players of either team.

Penalties (Parents & Spectators)

In the opinion of the referee, depending on the severity of the offense, the referee may take any of the following actions:

  1. The referee may issue a verbal warning to the coach of offending party’s team.
  2. The referee may stop the game and instruct the coaches to direct the parent / spectator to leave the field.
  3. The referee may abandon the game if the parent/spectator does not leave the field.
  4. The referee may abandon game if a credible threat is made to any member of the referee team.

Players

The conduct of the players is governed by the Laws of the Game as stated by FIFA and USSF. The Laws themselves describe penalties associated with violating the Laws of the Game. Additional penalties for players who engage in misconduct may be established by the club and/or league but may in no case be less severe than penalties established by FIFA, USSF, or ENYYSA.

Coaches, Assistant Coaches & Bench Personnel

It is the responsibility of all coaches to maintain the highest standards of conduct for themselves, their players and supporters in all matches. Failure to do so undermines the referee’s authority and the integrity of the game resulting in a hostile environment for players, the referee(s), coaches, assistant coaches, bench personnel and spectators. As role models for all of the participants and spectators, coaches participating in an Eastern New York Youth Soccer Association sanctioned event are expected to be supportive of, and to acknowledge the effort, good play and sportsmanship on the part of ALL players from either team in a contest. By example, coaches, assistant coaches and bench personnel are expected to show that although they are competing in a game, they have respect for their opponent, referees and spectators at all times. The Eastern New York Youth Soccer Association will not tolerate negative behavior exhibited either by demonstrative actions and gestures, or by ill-intentioned remarks, including those addressed toward the referees or members of an opposing team. Coaches exhibiting hostile, negative, sarcastic or otherwise ill-intended behavior toward referees, opposing players or coaches will be subject to sanction by the match official. Additional sanctions may be imposed by the club that the coach or assistant coach represents, the league that the match is being played under, or as allowed by Eastern New York State Soccer Association policies after a review of the match report.

  • Coaches shall not interact directly or indirectly with the coaches or players of the opposing team during the game in any manner that may be construed as negative, hostile or sarcastic either by way of demonstrative actions and gestures or by ill-intentioned remarks.
  • Coaches shall not offer dissent to any call made by the referee(s) at any time.
  • Coaches are not to address the Referee(s) during the game except to:
    1. Respond to a referee who has initiated a conversation.
    2. Point out emergency or safety issues.
    3. Make substitutions.
    4. Ask the referee, “What is the proper restart (i.e. direction and Indirect Free Kick or Direct Free Kick)?
    5. Ask for the time remaining in the half.
  • Coaches are allowed to ask a referee after a game or during the halftime interval, in a polite and constructive way, to explain a law or foul, but not judgment calls made in the game. a. Polite and friendly concern can be exchanged with the referee. If the polite tone of the conversation changes, the referee may abandon the exchange at any time. b. Absolutely no sarcasm, harassment or intimidation is allowed.

NOTE: It is recommended that coaches or other team members do not engage in any conversation with the match official once the match has concluded.

Penalties (Coaches, Assistant Coaches & Bench Personnel)

In the opinion of the referee, depending on the severity of the offense, the referee may take any of the following actions:

  1. The referee may issue a verbal warning to the offending coach, assistant coach or bench personnel.
  2. The referee may eject the offending coach, assistant coach or bench personnel. Once ejected, the individual will be required to leave the field immediately. NOTE: Referees are instructed not to display any cards to bench personnel. They are strictly reserved for players and substitutes.
  3. The referee should abandon the game, if the coach, assistant coach or bench personnel do not leave the field or any immediate adjoining area after having been instructed to do so.

Additional penalties associated with the ejection of a coach, assistant coach or bench personnel may be assessed by the local club or league which sanctioned the match in accordance with their documented policy. These penalties may be no less stringent than sanctions as may be imposed by ENYYSA following their review, if conducted, of the incident.

All cases of alleged abuse or assault of a referee shall be reported to the ENYYSA State Office and State Referee Administrator within 48 hours of the match that engendered said behavior.  ENYYSA will then conduct a verification of the complaint and subsequent actions as required by applicable sections of USSF Policy in effect at the time of the incident. Although ENYYSA is continually bound by USSF Policy and its various revisions, definition of referee abuse and referee assault found in USSF Policy 531-9 as of the creation date of this Zero Tolerance Policy is offered by way of information as follows:

Referee Abuse

(a) Referee abuse is a verbal statement or physical act not resulting in bodily contact which implies or threatens physical harm to a referee or the referee’s property or equipment.

(b) Abuse includes, but is not limited to the following acts committed upon a referee: using foul or abusive language toward a referee that implies or threatens physical harm; spewing any beverage on a referee’s physical property; or spitting at (but not on) the referee.

Referee Assault

(a) (i) Referee Assault is an intentional act of physical violence on any individual is a crime that could result in an arrest and punishable by fine, imprisonment and/or probation.

(ii) For purposes of this Policy, “intentional act” shall mean an act intended to bring about a result which will invade the interests of another in a way that is socially unacceptable. Unintended consequences of the act are irrelevant.

(b) Assault includes, but is not limited to the following acts committed upon a referee: hitting, kicking, punching, choking, spitting on, grabbing or bodily running into a referee; head butting; the act of kicking or throwing any object at a referee that could inflict injury; damaging the referee’s uniform or personal property, i.e. car, equipment, etc. as well as menacing or stalking.


Like Reply Quote
Junior Soccer Advertisements

A
Anonymous
Unregistered
Anonymous
Unregistered
A
Let's enforce the policy and allow the kids to enjoy this great game of Football on the pitch.

Like Reply Quote
A
Anonymous
Unregistered
Anonymous
Unregistered
A
I can't believe we're in a world where we actually have to spell this out for people. Bottom line parents, please control yourself.

Like Reply Quote
A
Anonymous
Unregistered
Anonymous
Unregistered
A
I agree with this completely and it is a sad state when we have to spell out the rules of common courtesy. That being said there needs to be some accountability for the referees as well. I have seen to many games, 11 v 11, where the referee never leaves the middle of the field, I have seen to many games where the referee thinks he is the only one that knows the rules of the game, I have seen to many games where the referee loses control of a game because he refuses to make a call and in the worst case I have ever seen an AR told a trainer that if he were "any good" he wouldn't be training girls. Where is the accountability for these types of t referees?

On the other hand I have also seen my fair share of outstanding referees. Referees willing to explain to a player why a foul was being called, referees who take control of a game before it even starts, referees who aren't afraid to ask an AR for help or say "I missed that one", "I had a bad angle and didn't see it".

A majority of the refereeing is good, just like a majority of parents are at the field to cheer for their children and their team. We need a way to get rid of the bad on both sides, unfortunately I don't see that happening anytime soon.

Like Reply Quote
A
Anonymous
Unregistered
Anonymous
Unregistered
A
ENYYSA is in a tricky spot because they also hear about how horrible the refs are from clubs and parents. Yes, they are absolutely right in publishing a code of conduct. I question what happens when it goes against the only paying customer in the economy. That's why it has never been fully enforced. Go ahead, ask a ref when was the last time the leagues went to bat for them. It's not too many times.

Like Reply Quote
A
Anonymous
Unregistered
Anonymous
Unregistered
A
Originally Posted by Anonymous
I agree with this completely and it is a sad state when we have to spell out the rules of common courtesy. That being said there needs to be some accountability for the referees as well. I have seen to many games, 11 v 11, where the referee never leaves the middle of the field, I have seen to many games where the referee thinks he is the only one that knows the rules of the game, I have seen to many games where the referee loses control of a game because he refuses to make a call and in the worst case I have ever seen an AR told a trainer that if he were "any good" he wouldn't be training girls. Where is the accountability for these types of t referees?

On the other hand I have also seen my fair share of outstanding referees. Referees willing to explain to a player why a foul was being called, referees who take control of a game before it even starts, referees who aren't afraid to ask an AR for help or say "I missed that one", "I had a bad angle and didn't see it".

A majority of the refereeing is good, just like a majority of parents are at the field to cheer for their children and their team. We need a way to get rid of the bad on both sides, unfortunately I don't see that happening anytime soon.

If a Coach or trainer observes the conduct from a referee they should report the issues. Don't make it about complaining. Cite examples and be specific. The referee will be asked and if necessary evaluated. A complaint from coach that is not specific will be ignored.

Like Reply Quote
A
Anonymous
Unregistered
Anonymous
Unregistered
A
Hasn't this policy been out for a few years now?

Like Reply Quote
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 20,423
Likes: 49
Chief Rocker
Back of THE NET
OP Online
Chief Rocker
Back of THE NET
Joined: Jul 2002
Posts: 20,423
Likes: 49
Originally Posted by Anonymous
Hasn't this policy been out for a few years now?

I think it’s a revision…made it a bit stronger.

Like Reply Quote
A
Anonymous
Unregistered
Anonymous
Unregistered
A
much more emphasis on the clubs and the coaches. This policy makes the club and coaches responsible. Now the clubs (club presidents) need to address the issue - rather than dumping it on the refs. refs take too much abuse - hopefully this will help that situation - assuming that you can even get a referee to begin with.

Like Reply Quote
Joined: Nov 2010
Posts: 1,106
Likes: 5
L
Back of THE NET
Offline
Back of THE NET
L
Joined: Nov 2010
Posts: 1,106
Likes: 5
Originally Posted by Anonymous
ENYYSA is in a tricky spot because they also hear about how horrible the refs are from clubs and parents. Yes, they are absolutely right in publishing a code of conduct. I question what happens when it goes against the only paying customer in the economy. That's why it has never been fully enforced. Go ahead, ask a ref when was the last time the leagues went to bat for them. It's not too many times.

You mention a relevant comment. It’s about ENFORCEMENT. Having rules and policies are great but if they are not enforced they are MEANINGLESS.

It starts with the Coaches, Trainers and parents to help police the anti social behavior. If they do nothing to support the referee (whether he is making mistakes or not) then it becomes incumbent upon the referee to take action and put a stop to it.

When it gets bad if yellow cards are not shown and if ejections are not made then the bullies will just continue. It’s that simple.

Like Reply Quote
A
Anonymous
Unregistered
Anonymous
Unregistered
A
Originally Posted by LIRef77
Originally Posted by Anonymous
ENYYSA is in a tricky spot because they also hear about how horrible the refs are from clubs and parents. Yes, they are absolutely right in publishing a code of conduct. I question what happens when it goes against the only paying customer in the economy. That's why it has never been fully enforced. Go ahead, ask a ref when was the last time the leagues went to bat for them. It's not too many times.

You mention a relevant comment. It’s about ENFORCEMENT. Having rules and policies are great but if they are not enforced they are MEANINGLESS.

It starts with the Coaches, Trainers and parents to help police the anti social behavior. If they do nothing to support the referee (whether he is making mistakes or not) then it becomes incumbent upon the referee to take action and put a stop to it.

When it gets bad if yellow cards are not shown and if ejections are not made then the bullies will just continue. It’s that simple.

100% right. Most refs keep the cards in their pocket and just try to get the match over with. Problem is the parents and coaches abuse starts to roll like a snowball downhill and then it is impossible to stop

Like Reply Quote
Quick Reply

Options
HTML is disabled
UBBCode is enabled
CAPTCHA Verification



Link Copied to Clipboard
Nobody Does It Better
Friends of BOTN

Newest Members
Fox Soccer, Tloader2, NHPRed09, ElmontSC26, BDADAA
15,066 Registered Users
BOTN Translation
Forum Statistics
Forums14
Topics9,063
Posts530,803
Members15,066
Most Online2,013
Jan 26th, 2014
Random Photos
Good Jams & Hot Licks 12

Click Here!