Fall '20 Scores & Standings:| CJSL | G-ECNL | G-ECRL | B-ECNL | B-ECRL | EDP | GA | LIJSL | MLS NXT | NCSANJ | WYSL |


Forum Search
Fall 2020
Scores & Standings
Girls Academy League
GA Schedule & Standings
MLS Next Scores & Standings
Scores & Standings
National League Playoffs
2020-21 National Playoffs
EDP 2020/2021
Scores & Standings
WYSL Scores & Standings
Fall '20 Scores & Standings
LIJSL Scores & Standings
Scores & Standings
ENY State Cups 2020-2021
Challenge Cup
NY State Cup
Maxpreps High School
New York
New Jersey
Connecticut
Maryland
Latest Posts
The new MLS youth league
by Anonymous - 10/24/20 10:55 PM
B2010:U11 Fall 2020/Spring 2021
by Anonymous - 10/24/20 08:28 PM
G2007:U14 Fall 2020/Spring 2021
by Anonymous - 10/23/20 05:12 PM
BOTN en Espaņol
Previous Thread
Next Thread
New Reply
Print Thread
Rate Thread
Heel Pain - Calcaneal Apophysitis- Severs Disease Information
#704220 04/19/18 11:36 AM
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 1
D
Back of THE NET
OP Offline
Back of THE NET
D
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 1
Severs Disease could be the cause of your athletes heel pain.

Severs Disease, also known as Calcaneal Apophysitis, is a painful foot condition that usually affects active children between 8 and 15 years of age, whose heel bones are actively growing. Active children may often suffer from Severs Disease when they experience sharp, aching pain in their feet, particularly in their heels, which may cause them to change the way they walk or run. A child with a pronated foot (flat foot) or a child with increased weight will have a greater predisposition to this condition.

The main symptom associated with Severs Disease (Calcaneal Apophysitis) is localized pain in the heel of the foot where the achilles tendon and ligaments attach to the heel bone, or calcaneus. The condition is caused by the gastrocnemius muscle pulling on the attachment point of the Achilles tendon on the calcaneal tuberosity. This overpulling of the achilles tendon along with increased stress to the growth plate (where the heel grows from), in combination with overuse are the main culprits that triggers this condition. The injury often is associated with running and jumping activities such as soccer, basketball, and track. However it can occur suddenly in children who do not participate in organized sports. This pain can be especially noticeable when a child walks or runs during any type of sporting or physical activity. Placing pressure on the area may also be extremely painful, particularly during jumping and propulsion.

Initial treatment for Severs Disease should begin with limiting physical activity. Maintaining intense exercise will only cause the pain to worsen and make the condition more severe. Also, treatment for Severs Disease is anti-inflammatory drugs in conjunction with R.I.C.E. therapy, (Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation). Unfortunately, many times these alone may prove to be inadequate. The condition, osteochondrosis at the tendon's attachment point on the calcaneal tuberosity, may include microscopic bone chipping, inflammation and tears, and in the most extreme cases, separation of both cartilage and bone from the bone. Wearing supportive heel cups and shoes is also important in order to help keep as much stress off the heel as possible, however supportive shoes alone will not usually be effective in curing the condition.

Orthotic shoe inserts are a good way to treat the symptoms, as well as help eliminate Severs Disease completely. Orthotic devices have had great success in treating children who suffer from Severs Disease, in addition to other painful foot ailments. The orthotics wil correct improper foot position while the child is weight bearing as well as provide some cushioning. If you have any further questions concerning this article feel free to contact me at the office.


Steven J. Stummer, D.P.M.
PURESTEP PODIATRY

OFFICE LOCATIONS:

2631 Merrick Rd., Ste. 300 Bellmore, N.Y. 11710 (516) 781-9800
220 Fort Salonga Rd. (25A) Northport, N.Y. 11768 (631) 262-8505
1800 Walt Whitman Road, Suite 120, Melville, N.Y. 11747 (631) 293-9540

Like Reply Quote
Junior Soccer Advertisements

Re: Heel Pain - Calcaneal Apophysitis- Severs Disease Information
Dr Steven Stumme #704222 04/19/18 12:39 PM
A
Anonymous
Unregistered
Anonymous
Unregistered
A
Appreciate this post Steven. My daughter was diagnosed with Sever's Disease this winter and her condition (pain) was similar to everything you described above. Like most on this board, I have a child who plays sports year round and some aches and pains come and go, but the Severs was a real issue. Months of playing indoor soccer and basketball caught up to her. What was a casual nuisance for her turned into a complete shut down.

We were able to avoid the anti-inflammatory drugs but the R.I.C.E. therapy became a daily routine along with the use of orthotic shoe inserts. Her condition has improved significantly, however I'm glad you posted this to make people aware of the condition so they don't write it off as simple foot or heel soreness. Only to see the condition worsen.

Like Reply Quote
Re: Heel Pain - Calcaneal Apophysitis- Severs Disease Information
Anonymous #704232 04/19/18 02:14 PM
A
Anonymous
Unregistered
Anonymous
Unregistered
A
My daughter also has this condo and found great help wearing the gel heel cups

Like Reply Quote
Quick Reply

Options
HTML is disabled
UBBCode is enabled
CAPTCHA Verification



Link Copied to Clipboard

Click Here!