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Does your team have a ball hog or two? How do you & your child cope?
#597292 04/01/15 02:59 PM
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Another controversial issue where many parents/players are having undue poor experiences because they have a teammate or two who rarely pass unless they have no other options, takes all the shots (they do score some), loses the ball when attacked, they don't see their teammates open down field, etc.

How do you as a parent and your child as a teammate cope with this situation?

This may involve a parent coach's child but I've seen it on a few teams where there was no parental relationship.

One player I've been told has been instructed to pass more on his travel team for the past couple of years with no success. We had the "pleasure" of playing with him on our tournament team. How frustrating for all us parents & teammates. Regardless if teammates yell out his name to pass, we think he tunes them out & has radar for shots on goal. Granted he's a powerful player and does get his scores. But we can see not many teammates are so thrilled with his type of play & with his seeking all the glory.

In this case, both team's coaches have been unsuccessful in breaking him out of this detrimental habit.

And I must add, when scrimmaging each other, he is also a brute on offense, when he drives/dribbles towards the goal, he has some pretty sharp elbows knocking kids down with some actually getting hurt. One child much smaller in stature got the wind knocked out of him & his dad was furious. We're on the same team no less!

And now my son has the "pleasure" of playing with him again on another development training team. He dreads playing with him. Already the coach has scolded him to stop holding the ball so long & pass.

And on our current team, we have another player who has been a ball hog & because of that he has not been as effective on the field for us - again causing undue frustration.

So, share your experiences and let us know how your coach/trainer, players & parents cope with this type of player. Some of us just mutter under our breath & suck it up. What a great experience!

It is more common than one would think.

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Re: Does your team have a ball hog or two? How do you & your child cope?
Sockertome #597300 04/01/15 03:32 PM
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Normally when this occurs, it is one of the most skilled players on the team. It has to be handled by the coach. If the coach is constantly instructing the player to share the ball more with no results. The coach must take them out of the game and explain the style of play he wants to see out there. Taking away playing time is the only way to get through to the ball hogs. The coach or trainer has to be consistent with the non passer or the problem will continue. A ball hog will always lead to lots of dissension among the kids. Especially if it is a really strong team, in which all the kids have skills and are capable of taking a pass and possessing the ball.

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Re: Does your team have a ball hog or two? How do you & your child cope?
Sockertome #597301 04/01/15 03:40 PM
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My daughter left a team due to other striker never passing the ball
it was same story weel in and week out
player in question would recieve ball and attempt to dribble to goal regardless of # of defenders in her path or options of other teammates making runs,over laping or supporting
she did score some but most of the time 90% or more it would just lead to a turn over
she was not coaches daughter and she was told to pass by coach trainer and players
but her old man who knew nothing about soccer would just keep telling her to go go go and that she was great
so long story short my daughter asked to switch to va team she had played on on a few tournaments
we did and it has been all for the better

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Re: Does your team have a ball hog or two? How do you & your child cope?
Sockertome #597302 04/01/15 03:41 PM
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Yet another topic to stir up garbage, You might be what's wrong with youth soccer.

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Re: Does your team have a ball hog or two? How do you & your child cope?
Sockertome #597307 04/01/15 03:59 PM
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Originally Posted By: Sockertome
Another controversial issue where many parents/players are having undue poor experiences because they have a teammate or two who rarely pass unless they have no other options, takes all the shots (they do score some), loses the ball when attacked, they don't see their teammates open down field, etc.

How do you as a parent and your child as a teammate cope with this situation?

This may involve a parent coach's child but I've seen it on a few teams where there was no parental relationship.

One player I've been told has been instructed to pass more on his travel team for the past couple of years with no success. We had the "pleasure" of playing with him on our tournament team. How frustrating for all us parents & teammates. Regardless if teammates yell out his name to pass, we think he tunes them out & has radar for shots on goal. Granted he's a powerful player and does get his scores. But we can see not many teammates are so thrilled with his type of play & with his seeking all the glory.

In this case, both team's coaches have been unsuccessful in breaking him out of this detrimental habit.

And I must add, when scrimmaging each other, he is also a brute on offense, when he drives/dribbles towards the goal, he has some pretty sharp elbows knocking kids down with some actually getting hurt. One child much smaller in stature got the wind knocked out of him & his dad was furious. We're on the same team no less!

And now my son has the "pleasure" of playing with him again on another development training team. He dreads playing with him. Already the coach has scolded him to stop holding the ball so long & pass.

And on our current team, we have another player who has been a ball hog & because of that he has not been as effective on the field for us - again causing undue frustration.

So, share your experiences and let us know how your coach/trainer, players & parents cope with this type of player. Some of us just mutter under our breath & suck it up. What a great experience!

It is more common than one would think.



yes, quite common. a parent can do absolutely nothing about. this type of play, if it cannot be discouraged by the other players must be noticed and dealt with by the coach, who must bench or cut player who doesn't want to open his or her eyes to best/easiest options on the field. that's it really. not complicated at all.

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Re: Does your team have a ball hog or two? How do you & your child cope?
Sockertome #597308 04/01/15 04:19 PM
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There is only one person to blame for this buddy and that is the coach who allows it.

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Re: Does your team have a ball hog or two? How do you & your child cope?
Anonymous #597313 04/01/15 05:27 PM
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Originally Posted By: Anonymous
Yet another topic to stir up garbage, You might be what's wrong with youth soccer.
This and his other thread are in my opinion constructive and I welcome the change of pace from the chest pounding/pot stirring posts.

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Re: Does your team have a ball hog or two? How do you & your child cope?
Sockertome #597314 04/01/15 05:29 PM
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Bench the kid. Problem solved

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Re: Does your team have a ball hog or two? How do you & your child cope?
Sockertome #597315 04/01/15 05:52 PM
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Originally Posted By: Sockertome
Another controversial issue where many parents/players are having undue poor experiences because they have a teammate or two who rarely pass unless they have no other options, takes all the shots (they do score some), loses the ball when attacked, they don't see their teammates open down field, etc.

How do you as a parent and your child as a teammate cope with this situation?



There are couple of points to unpack here. What constitutes ball-hogging? and What age groups are we talking about?

If we're talking about U-littles (U6-8), then we should be encouraging kids dribbling and getting comfortable on the ball even if it looks like ball-hogging at times. The field is smaller and the number of players on the field are fewer so all of the kids should get time on the ball even if few are hogging it.

As for the other point, what is ball hogging? Obviously ball-hogging is holding on to the ball and attempting to dribble through a mass of defenders and getting stripped lost every single time. If that same player gets a shot off on target more than half the time, is it still ball-hogging?

Is it ball-hogging if a midfielder carries the ball 20-30 yards (either because the defense gives the player space or the midfielder is able to juke couple of defenders) and shoots or makes a key pass.

I have been on the sidelines and hear complaints if a kid doesn't get rid of the ball after two touches, which is ridiculous. On the other hand, I have seen kids hit the preverbal brick walls over and over again and spur obvious open players. Some of this is due to kids not feeling confident turning the ball over to a player that he perceives is not good. But mostly I think it is because kids can't multitask (make a decision to pass while dribbling).

I saw a form of this in yesterday's US Men's friendly against the Swiss. Bradley was on a counter attack (3 v 2 situation) and had 2 forwards ahead of him. An obviously open player was Zardes on the left, but Zardes is the new kid and had clanked the ball all game so Bradley held on to the ball for his own shot or for Altidor to get in position on the right. In the end, the ball was harmlessly poked away.

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Re: Does your team have a ball hog or two? How do you & your child cope?
Anonymous #597318 04/01/15 07:14 PM
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Originally Posted By: Anonymous
Bench the kid. Problem solved


Agree totally. But there is more to it. When I coached I started with a BU7 team and coached them through BU10. When they started, there were a few who just didn't pass. But after years of practices that implemented 1-2 touch drills, they all learn.

Let's cut to the chase - its a coach's problem. But coaches are so worried about losing their "star" players that they let them get away with all manner of stuff that is detrimental to the team. And if its the coach's kid, its probably because he/she is too enamored with their child's play to be objective. Either way, its a coach problem.

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Re: Does your team have a ball hog or two? How do you & your child cope?
Anonymous #597324 04/01/15 09:36 PM
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Originally Posted By: Anonymous
Yet another topic to stir up garbage, You might be what's wrong with youth soccer.


Sorry to waste your precious time reading other's garbage. Tell them to suck it up or move to another club.

If you have nothing to contribute with positive or negative experiences then don't waste your time here.

Why waste your brain cells reading this garbage & to even spare the time to type out your irrelevant response.

Don't bother responding - save yourself the grief.

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Re: Does your team have a ball hog or two? How do you & your child cope?
Anonymous #597327 04/01/15 10:03 PM
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Originally Posted By: Anonymous
Yet another topic to stir up garbage, You might be what's wrong with youth soccer.


Couldn't disagree more. This seems to be the one guy who has an interest in talking about actual issues effecting youth soccer (and sports in general) instead of so much of the other garbage on every other thread about which team/academy/whatever is the best.

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Re: Does your team have a ball hog or two? How do you & your child cope?
Sockertome #597329 04/01/15 10:12 PM
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My son is the teams ball hog. I tell him not to pass the ball because all the other kids stink and there's no point. As long as he keeps scoring the coach won't take him out because it's all about winning (and my son). All the other parents are jealous because my son is so incredible. I can't wait for him to turn pro one day and play for Barcelona. When other kids on the team get the ball I scream "PASS" "PASS" but when my son gets the ball I scream "GO ALL THE WAY". If another kid on my sons team loses the ball I make really loud obnoxious noises or say things like " COME ON" or "WHAT THE HELL". Sometimes I wish the rest of the team won't show up for the game and my son can play against the other team all by himself.

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Re: Does your team have a ball hog or two? How do you & your child cope?
Anonymous #597332 04/01/15 10:42 PM
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Originally Posted By: Anonymous
Originally Posted By: Anonymous
Bench the kid. Problem solved


Agree totally. But there is more to it. When I coached I started with a BU7 team and coached them through BU10. When they started, there were a few who just didn't pass. But after years of practices that implemented 1-2 touch drills, they all learn.

Let's cut to the chase - its a coach's problem. But coaches are so worried about losing their "star" players that they let them get away with all manner of stuff that is detrimental to the team. And if its the coach's kid, its probably because he/she is too enamored with their child's play to be objective. Either way, its a coach problem.


Benching a U7-U8 kid for dribbling the ball is probably the worst thing you can do. Players at this age should be encouraged to dribble the ball in order to develop their foot skills, even at the expense of them being labeled a "ball-hog". There is plenty of time in the player's future to develop team-related principles and tactics. Let me pose these questions to the parent who believes that their U7-U8 child is negatively impacted by having a "ball-hog" on their team... why isn't your own child the ball-hog? Does he/she lack confidence, ability, creativity? Is he or she encouraged to be creative with the ball?

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Re: Does your team have a ball hog or two? How do you & your child cope?
Sockertome #597333 04/01/15 11:12 PM
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Let me clarify as to the age specific incidences. It doesn't apply to the very young ages where they're just getting a taste of kicking the ball towards the goal.

For the person above who dissects how to define ball hogging with examples ("As for the other point, what is ball hogging? Obviously ball-hogging is holding on to the ball and attempting to dribble through a mass of defenders and getting stripped lost every single time. If that same player gets a shot off on target more than half the time, is it still ball-hogging?") {YES}

I think the overall consensus would agree with both parts of this definition.

When on a team of varying playing abilities, experience, skill levels - there always stands out one or a few players who are a step ahead of the rest and thus would be more conducive to handling the ball and more in tuned to scoring. And it is mostly acceptable by the team, teammates and parents.

But it is that player - regardless if they are the super star player or not, who has a total disregard of teammates who are on the same team who can assist in the offense but rarely passes, tries to fight thru defenders, attempts as many shots on goal and loses the ball more often than not - and ignores teammates yelling "pass the ball".

Good job anonymous in defining a ball hog!

And we all agree it's the coach's problem. But when the coach does nothing, or tries but is unsuccessful, then what?!

So many will continue to suffer frustration, displeasure and maybe a bit of anger. What a great experience for the rest!

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Re: Does your team have a ball hog or two? How do you & your child cope?
Anonymous #597337 04/01/15 11:31 PM
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Originally Posted By: Anonymous
Originally Posted By: Anonymous
Originally Posted By: Anonymous
Bench the kid. Problem solved


Agree totally. But there is more to it. When I coached I started with a BU7 team and coached them through BU10. When they started, there were a few who just didn't pass. But after years of practices that implemented 1-2 touch drills, they all learn.

Let's cut to the chase - its a coach's problem. But coaches are so worried about losing their "star" players that they let them get away with all manner of stuff that is detrimental to the team. And if its the coach's kid, its probably because he/she is too enamored with their child's play to be objective. Either way, its a coach problem.


Benching a U7-U8 kid for dribbling the ball is probably the worst thing you can do. Players at this age should be encouraged to dribble the ball in order to develop their foot skills, even at the expense of them being labeled a "ball-hog". There is plenty of time in the player's future to develop team-related principles and tactics. Let me pose these questions to the parent who believes that their U7-U8 child is negatively impacted by having a "ball-hog" on their team... why isn't your own child the ball-hog? Does he/she lack confidence, ability, creativity? Is he or she encouraged to be creative with the ball?


I guess you make a very good point for this age group. How about the older age groups?

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Re: Does your team have a ball hog or two? How do you & your child cope?
Sockertome #597338 04/01/15 11:36 PM
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I knew a team that had 2 primo players, each a coach's kid. One was a consistent high scorer. The other a very good scorer also but you can tell the kid had an intensity level that reflected the child's play - it almost seemed trying to one up the other, trying to get their own glory, trying to be the star of the game. No doubt an excellent player, but was a noticeable ball hog & instead of passing to the other scorer, would run into traffic to make the play, sometimes makes the shot, sometimes score sometimes loses the ball.

But is was tolerated as no one could would speak up. Yes, it fell upon both coaches to "retrain" but one didn't want to cause a wave so they lived with it for years. They were a winning team so it made it easier to live with.

Both now are going their separate ways for better opportunities, both definitely on the road to playing college ball.

This case was older than U10s

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Re: Does your team have a ball hog or two? How do you & your child cope?
Anonymous #597340 04/01/15 11:43 PM
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Originally Posted By: Anonymous
Normally when this occurs, it is one of the most skilled players on the team. It has to be handled by the coach. If the coach is constantly instructing the player to share the ball more with no results. The coach must take them out of the game and explain the style of play he wants to see out there. Taking away playing time is the only way to get through to the ball hogs. The coach or trainer has to be consistent with the non passer or the problem will continue. A ball hog will always lead to lots of dissension among the kids. Especially if it is a really strong team, in which all the kids have skills and are capable of taking a pass and possessing the ball.


very true.

In the case I described, the coach did bench the player many times. but the kid was a bruiser of a scorer. so I guess it was hard to keep the kid out whole games.

Hearing coaches and teammates yell pass the ball - I can not understand how this kid continues to get away with it everywhere he plays. Coaches have only so much backbone to do what is appropriate I guess.

Too bad - just more kids having poor playing experiences.

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Re: Does your team have a ball hog or two? How do you & your child cope?
Anonymous #597341 04/01/15 11:50 PM
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Originally Posted By: Anonymous
Originally Posted By: Anonymous
Originally Posted By: Anonymous
Bench the kid. Problem solved


Agree totally. But there is more to it. When I coached I started with a BU7 team and coached them through BU10. When they started, there were a few who just didn't pass. But after years of practices that implemented 1-2 touch drills, they all learn.

Let's cut to the chase - its a coach's problem. But coaches are so worried about losing their "star" players that they let them get away with all manner of stuff that is detrimental to the team. And if its the coach's kid, its probably because he/she is too enamored with their child's play to be objective. Either way, its a coach problem.


Benching a U7-U8 kid for dribbling the ball is probably the worst thing you can do. Players at this age should be encouraged to dribble the ball in order to develop their foot skills, even at the expense of them being labeled a "ball-hog". There is plenty of time in the player's future to develop team-related principles and tactics. Let me pose these questions to the parent who believes that their U7-U8 child is negatively impacted by having a "ball-hog" on their team... why isn't your own child the ball-hog? Does he/she lack confidence, ability, creativity? Is he or she encouraged to be creative with the ball?


Bingo

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Re: Does your team have a ball hog or two? How do you & your child cope?
GG1 N J18 #597342 04/01/15 11:50 PM
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Originally Posted By: GG1 N J18
My daughter left a team due to other striker never passing the ball
it was same story weel in and week out
player in question would recieve ball and attempt to dribble to goal regardless of # of defenders in her path or options of other teammates making runs,over laping or supporting
she did score some but most of the time 90% or more it would just lead to a turn over
she was not coaches daughter and she was told to pass by coach trainer and players
but her old man who knew nothing about soccer would just keep telling her to go go go and that she was great
so long story short my daughter asked to switch to va team she had played on on a few tournaments
we did and it has been all for the better


Sorry to hear your daughter had a poor experience. Yours is a case where it was intolerable and yours did something about it. Good for the both of you. Sad role model of a parent. And the teammates she leaves behind, they will continue to be frustrated.

Glad things are working out for the better. Good luck!

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Re: Does your team have a ball hog or two? How do you & your child cope?
Anonymous #597343 04/01/15 11:54 PM
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Originally Posted By: Anonymous
My son is the teams ball hog. I tell him not to pass the ball because all the other kids stink and there's no point. As long as he keeps scoring the coach won't take him out because it's all about winning (and my son). All the other parents are jealous because my son is so incredible. I can't wait for him to turn pro one day and play for Barcelona. When other kids on the team get the ball I scream "PASS" "PASS" but when my son gets the ball I scream "GO ALL THE WAY". If another kid on my sons team loses the ball I make really loud obnoxious noises or say things like " COME ON" or "WHAT THE HELL". Sometimes I wish the rest of the team won't show up for the game and my son can play against the other team all by himself.


Thanks for this very unique perspective. I'm sure your fellow readers will appreciate your insight.

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Re: Does your team have a ball hog or two? How do you & your child cope?
Sockertome #597345 04/02/15 07:53 AM
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Originally Posted By: Sockertome
Let me clarify as to the age specific incidences. It doesn't apply to the very young ages where they're just getting a taste of kicking the ball towards the goal.

For the person above who dissects how to define ball hogging with examples ("As for the other point, what is ball hogging? Obviously ball-hogging is holding on to the ball and attempting to dribble through a mass of defenders and getting stripped lost every single time. If that same player gets a shot off on target more than half the time, is it still ball-hogging?") {YES}

I think the overall consensus would agree with both parts of this definition.

When on a team of varying playing abilities, experience, skill levels - there always stands out one or a few players who are a step ahead of the rest and thus would be more conducive to handling the ball and more in tuned to scoring. And it is mostly acceptable by the team, teammates and parents.

But it is that player - regardless if they are the super star player or not, who has a total disregard of teammates who are on the same team who can assist in the offense but rarely passes, tries to fight thru defenders, attempts as many shots on goal and loses the ball more often than not - and ignores teammates yelling "pass the ball".

Good job anonymous in defining a ball hog!

And we all agree it's the coach's problem. But when the coach does nothing, or tries but is unsuccessful, then what?!

So many will continue to suffer frustration, displeasure and maybe a bit of anger. What a great experience for the rest!


Why let a twelve year old ruing your day. There are so many worse things to worry about.
Hopefully the superstar will move on if he is so great. Until then you should know your kids are still having fun. Practice,practice and more practice…… kids like practice more than games. There is never any pressure or glory at practice

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Re: Does your team have a ball hog or two? How do you & your child cope?
Sockertome #597348 04/02/15 08:44 AM
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Nice clarification of ball hogging. I see it on my daughters team. Frustrates the heck out of the rest of the players. #1, you know the ball isn't being returned. #2 when the player tries to handle the ball from the backfield forward and gets met by 3-4 opposing players, instead of learning to control the last 1/3 of the field. #3 when the player finally gives the ball up for "a run" that the coaches and parents get so excited about but realistically lucky to connect the pass every 1 out of 25 times.

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Re: Does your team have a ball hog or two? How do you & your child cope?
Anonymous #597357 04/02/15 10:33 AM
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Originally Posted By: Anonymous
My son is the teams ball hog. I tell him not to pass the ball because all the other kids stink and there's no point. As long as he keeps scoring the coach won't take him out because it's all about winning (and my son). All the other parents are jealous because my son is so incredible. I can't wait for him to turn pro one day and play for Barcelona. When other kids on the team get the ball I scream "PASS" "PASS" but when my son gets the ball I scream "GO ALL THE WAY". If another kid on my sons team loses the ball I make really loud obnoxious noises or say things like " COME ON" or "WHAT THE HELL". Sometimes I wish the rest of the team won't show up for the game and my son can play against the other team all by himself.
You must be the guy from Met Oval.

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Sockertome #597360 04/02/15 10:50 AM
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Originally Posted By: Sockertome
Let me clarify as to the age specific incidences. It doesn't apply to the very young ages where they're just getting a taste of kicking the ball towards the goal.

For the person above who dissects how to define ball hogging with examples ("As for the other point, what is ball hogging? Obviously ball-hogging is holding on to the ball and attempting to dribble through a mass of defenders and getting stripped lost every single time. If that same player gets a shot off on target more than half the time, is it still ball-hogging?") {YES}

I think the overall consensus would agree with both parts of this definition.

When on a team of varying playing abilities, experience, skill levels - there always stands out one or a few players who are a step ahead of the rest and thus would be more conducive to handling the ball and more in tuned to scoring. And it is mostly acceptable by the team, teammates and parents.

But it is that player - regardless if they are the super star player or not, who has a total disregard of teammates who are on the same team who can assist in the offense but rarely passes, tries to fight thru defenders, attempts as many shots on goal and loses the ball more often than not - and ignores teammates yelling "pass the ball".

Good job anonymous in defining a ball hog!

And we all agree it's the coach's problem. But when the coach does nothing, or tries but is unsuccessful, then what?!

So many will continue to suffer frustration, displeasure and maybe a bit of anger. What a great experience for the rest!


when the coach does nothing, that's really the end of it, especially on a travel team. find another team, if it really bothers you. but, and i've seen at the high school level as well, if the high school coach does nothing about the bad play, well then, as a player all you can do is try to convince the player to do a better job. however, chances are very slim that a high school player is going to listen to anybody but a coach's benching, or threats of violence from other players, which boys are much likely to engage in than girls. finding another team, at the high school level, is not an option. you must continue to play the best you can. that's all.

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